Tuesday, September 16, 2014
 
www.cyberspacesolutionsinc.com
 
  YouTubeTwitterMySpace Google+ Facebook
 
www.cyberspacesolutionsinc.com Bookmark and Share
  Search
 
News Minimize
13

Exclusive Video: OSI's Kevin Moore and Jim Matheos Talk 'Fire Makes Thunder'
guitarworld.com  

Comments

# Memed
Sunday, September 29, 2013 10:30 AM
They don't stop you because the saplmes don't generate enough income/resources to give artist the means to put limits on the consumption. Coke is a bad example because they have the resources to strong-arm vendors into doing whatever they want and can make lots of money on tiny margins. Ads on YouTube make a tiny, tiny amount of money. If you write Chocolate Rain that might generate enough money to live off of, but people aren't paying rent off YouTube ads. The artists don't set the terms with YouTube, they just know YouTube isn't going to do jack to protect their music from being uploaded anyway, so they just accept that they're going to be violated by YouTube and put their music up. That's why I say it's a necessary evil. You say that YouTube could put viewing limits on videos. I'm sure they could, but they have no incentive to do that. They are the ultimate winners when people watch videos. And they set the terms of the consumption. The artists don't have much of a choice otherwise. If they had a team of hackers and lawyers to protect their music online, they'd do it, but where are they supposed to get the money to do that? If they were as large as Coca-Cola then maybe they could, but they're just guys making music. And even if they did that, the current culture is such that when artists do try to protect their music they're painted as arrogant douchebags (*cough*Metallica*cough*) who just want everyone's money.So if I filled up on saplmes at Costco, I would feel that I am doing something unethical. The fact that they don't hire a security guard to slap saplmes out of my hands after I eat a certain limit doesn't mean that I should just keep eating. They are relying on the social contract when they put the music on YouTube, and the social contract isn't paying them back.I'm not saying music is special and shouldn't change with the times. But right now people are making choices about whether to continue consuming the saplmes or to pay for the songs, and the author is simply saying that the responsible choice is to buy the song if you like it rather than fill up on the saplmes. I think that's completely reasonable. And I do think a good song is worth a dollar.

Post Comment

Name (required)

Email (required)

CAPTCHA image
Enter the code shown above:

 
 
www.cyberspacesolutionsinc.com
 
 
www.cyberspacesolutionsinc.com www.cyberspacesolutionsinc.com www.cyberspacesolutionsinc.com